The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday decided to allow the Trump administration to enforce its ban on transgender troops while litigation over the ban continues, granting the administration a stay. The high court split 5-4 in allowing the plan to take effect, with the court's five conservatives greenlighting it and its four liberal members saying they would not have.

A U.S. District Court judge had issued an injunction in December 2017 blocking the ban, but the Supreme Court's stay stops that ruling from taking effect for now. The case is still pending in the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals, and the Supreme Court will not weigh in on the constitutionality of the ban itself until after that ruling.

"As always, we treat all transgender persons with respect and dignity," Lt. Col. Carla Gleason said in a statement. "DoD's proposed policy is NOT a ban on service by transgender persons. It is critical that DoD be permitted to implement personnel policies that it determines are necessary to ensure the most lethal and combat effective fighting force in the world. DoD's proposed policy is based on professional military judgment and will ensure that the U.S. Armed Forces remain the most lethal and combat effective fighting force in the world."

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