A small team of Alaska State Troopers will continue to maintain a presence in Girdwood until June 2016, an additional six months beyond the previously settled on date of Dec. 31, 2015 for troopers to pull out.


A sergeant and four troopers will continue to operate out of the Girdwood post and monitor the Seward Highway between Miles 55 and 112, troopers said in a statement. The team will also be responsible for calls placed in Hope, outside Whittier and other unincorporated areas of the Prince William Sound.


Troopers will also maintain the Seward Highway Traffic Safety Corridor between Miles 87 and 117, according to troopers.


The communities of Girdwood, Indian, Portage and Bird are all inside the Municipality of Anchorage but are not covered by Anchorage Police Department services, troopers wrote. Roughly 2,500 people live in the area. A meeting was held Oct. 5 to discuss law enforcement options for the communities, but nothing was formally decided.


The muni asked troopers to stay longer to give the community of Girdwood time to decide what to do before troopers pull out for good.


“The community’s, you know, breathing a collective sigh of relief,” said Sam Daniel, the co-chair of Girdwood’s Public Safety Taskforce.


Daniel said they have to use this time to figure out a long-term solution.


“Our charge as a task force, as a community, to try and come up with a plan a future plan for Girdwood is still there,” he said. “We are not immune to all of the problems that they have in the big city, whether it’s domestic violence or property crime or teenagers just partying on the weekends.”


“We firmly believe the Municipality of Anchorage has an obligation to provide police services to the Girdwood area and Indian and Bird,” agreed AST Director Col. James Cockrell.