A lot of Alaskans love to garden, but they may not have the space. Likewise, some have yards, but may not have the experience or time to maintain a garden. An Alaska Community Action on Toxics program known as Yarducopia is pairing people who want to plant with people who have the space to do it.


Shona Mull moved to Anchorage with her husband two years ago.


“We live in an apartment and there’s no yard of any kind to speak of,” Mull said.


Recently, Yarducopia made it possible for Mull to meet Michele Wasson, whose situation is a little different. Wasson has a yard with space for a garden but she doesn’t have a lot of time or experience.


“It’s a combination of the time and maybe my skill set. This is my first time really having a planted garden,” Wasson said, adding, “It’s really nice to have some expert advice.”


Yarducopia is directed by Michelle Wilber, who said the relationship between the homeowner with the garden and the person agreeing to share the labor can vary. Generally, they split a lot of the chores, then split the harvest at the end of the season. An additional 10 percent goes to a charity of their choice.


“Our goals are to spread the knowledge of organic gardening methods. To spread access to fresh self-grown vegetables as widely as possible, there are so many benefits,” Wilber said.


The nonprofit charges a fee of $100 on a sliding scale for the homeowner getting the garden. They provide all the materials to put the garden in including the plants as well as expert advice throughout the summer. The person helping with the labor isn’t charged a fee.


Wilber said they are still accepting people interested in having a garden at their house as well as people who are looking for a place to garden. For more information, visit the Yarducopia website.


KTVA 11’s Lauren Maxwell can be reached via email or on Twitter.