Every nook and corner of Andrea Fuller’s new store, Cobb Street Market, is filled with local flavor. Quilted halibut potholders hang above jars of marinated vegetables, and tables are stacked with honey, wooden toys and t-shirts.

The shop across from the old Fred Meyer building in Palmer has only been open for less than a month, but Fuller said she’s already seen a demand for her unique merchandise.

“This is Northern Gnomes. I love them to death and they're absolutely phenomenal. We've sold 50 of these gnomes in the past three weeks,” she said.

Fuller’s been selling for other small businesses at My Matanuska Marketplace at the Palmer Train Depot and thought now was a good time to expand.

She went from representing about 30 businesses once a week to more than 65 vendors at Cobb Street.

“They typically don't have a place to sell, they usually go online or do shows. So now they have a little place to call their own, they can come in, meet with customer, promote themselves,” Fuller said.

She wanted to make sure there’s something for everyone and give artists a new avenue for sales.

“Once I saw these young entrepreneurs and people who were struggling to work from their homes start doing well, it was like now we're on to something,” Fuller said.

Customers like Veronica Pillans appreciate the eclectic stock.

“I think it will fit great into the community. Palmer is community-minded and we give back to our entrepreneurs, so this is great,” Pillans said.

Fuller said the selection changes daily depending on what artists bring in. That keeps customers coming back for the newest wares and keeps the money in our community.

Cobb Street Market will hold different events throughout the summer with food trucks and patio seating. There’s even a Unicorn Block Party coming up later in April.

Copyright 2018 KTVA. All rights reserved.

YOU MAY ALSO BE INTERESTED IN:

Conservation groups preserve Palmer farmland parcel 

At his desk or on the mat, Palmer's Farris excels 

Native artisans worry ivory bans in other states could reverberate in Alaska