It's a four-letter word that can strike fear in the hearts of parents. It's not unusual for children to pick-up lice at school and, unfortunately, much more difficult to get rid of them.

Danni Hall had the experience last year when her then-6-year-old daughter came home with lice.

"I had already gone to Walgreen's once and the treatment didn't work," said Hall. "So, I went back, and I was on the floor of Walgreen's crying on my cellphone, calling my little sister in Washington state. She told me when her daughter had it, she just went to one of those places where they treat it. And that was where I had the epiphany, that there's a place that takes care of this? Because I would have done anything to not have been in that predicament."

Turns out there was not a place in Alaska specifically geared to treat lice, so after a period of training, Hall opened the first one. The Alaska Lice Clinic is located in a medical building on the campus of Alaska Regional Hospital.

According to Hall, over-the-counter products don't work well for treating lice. Once the lice or their eggs, called nits, are discovered, the only effective way to get rid of them is by hand. Hall said it's important to make sure everyone in the family is checked because if one person still has lice, there's a good chance they'll spread them around.

"I encourage people to tell their friends," said Hall. "It's hard to get people to do that but I have to spell it out. You are going to get it again if you don't figure out which family member or which friend has it. You will get it again."

Hall said she charges $25 for a head-check, which includes showing people what to look for. She said the average cost of treatment, which can take several hours, is $250 but includes several follow-ups and a 30-day guarantee.

The Anchorage School District does not allow students with lice to go to school but students are able to attend class if they have just eggs or nits. According to ASD policy,  school nurses will make the final determination.

Copyright 2018 KTVA. All rights reserved.


Bugs: Suffering stings for science 

Story Time with Aunt Phil: Cordova's famous iceworm