LOS ANGELES -- More people appear to be choosing to use an Uber for rides to the hospital over an ambulance, a recent study has found, CBS Los Angeles writes. Two professors looked at data from places across America.

David Slusky, an assistant professor of economics at the University of Kansas, along with co-author Leon Moskatel, examined ambulance rates in more than 750 U.S. cities nationwide.

The data looked at ambulance usage rates since Uber was introduced in those markets between the years 2013 and 2015.

The data, according to the study (which you can read here), appeared to show that ambulance usage rates had declined by at least 7 percent in those markets.

"Many patients don't need something that can break traffic laws and don't need something staffed by paramedics with a bunch of fancy equipment," Slusky said.

The San Jose Mercury News reports that Moskatel had to map all the dates Uber entered a certain market, based on the ride-hailing company's public announcements. The ambulance rates were obtained from the National Emergency Medical Service Information System.

Continue reading at CBSNews.com