Global warming is hurting people's health a bit more than previously thought, but there's hope that the Earth — and populations — can heal if the planet kicks its coal habit, a group of doctors and other experts said.

The poor and elderly are most threatened by worsening climate change, but there remains "glimmers of progress" especially after the 2015 Paris agreement to limit heat-trapping carbon dioxide emissions, according to a new big study published Monday in the British medical journal Lancet.

"Although progress has been historically slow, the past 5 years have seen an accelerated response, and in 2017, momentum is building," the authors wrote. Despite the Trump administration's decision last May to withdraw from the Paris climate agreement, "the global community has demonstrated overwhelming support for enhanced action on climate change," which the researchers believe will have "very positive short-term and long-term health benefits."

Comparing the report to a health checkup, four researchers and several outside experts described Earth's prognosis as "guarded."

"There are some very severe warning signs, but there are some hopeful indicators too," said co-author Dr. Howard Frumkin, a professor of environmental health at the University of Washington. "Given the right treatment and aggressive efforts to prevent things from getting worse, I think there's hope."

The report highlighted health problems stemming from more frequent heat wavesair pollution, wildfires and other woes. While severe weather-related disasters have been costly, deaths haven't been increasing because society is doing a better but more expensive job adjusting to the changing conditions, the researchers noted.

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