Heavy snow blanketed parts of the Upper Midwest with more than a foot of snow on Tuesday, leaving residents there and in the Rockies waking up to frigid temperatures that plunged as much as 50 degrees overnight.


The rest of the Midwest and the East are expecting a dose of the icy weather later this week thanks to a powerful storm that hit Alaska with hurricane-force winds over the weekend.


lower 48 snow


 


A look at the storm and its effects:


SNOW, SNOW… AND MORE SNOW


More than a foot of snow fell in northern Wisconsin, while Michigan’s Upper Peninsula was buried under more than 14 inches of powder with at least another foot expected before the storm moves out Wednesday.


A much as 15 inches of snow has buried parts of Minnesota, and more is expected. The Minnesota Department of Transportation said Tuesday that roads and highways in about two-thirds of the state were completely or partially covered with snow, CBS Minnesota reported.


The Minnesota State Patrol said at least two people were killed in accidents on icy roads, and troopers handled 475 crashes and more than 700 spinouts statewide by Monday evening.


Schools canceled classes across the region, including at Northern Michigan University. Multimedia journalism student Mikenzie Frost said she was headed out the door to figure skating practice early Tuesday when she got a text from the school saying it was closed. So, she shifted plans.


“Going to buy a shovel because we don’t have one,” Frost said. “We’re probably the only people in the U.P. (Upper Peninsula) that don’t have one.”


Other students weren’t so lucky. Classrooms were closed at St. Cloud Cathedral, a seventh- through 12th-grade private school in Minnesota, but students had to log into the school’s online portal to complete classwork from home.


“I’ll be honest,” Principal Lynn Grewing laughed. “There has been some grumbling.”


AND THEN THE COLD


In Billings, Montana, where temperatures in the high-60s fell into the single digits, Patsy Kimmel said she’d been warned before arriving to visit family and celebrate her 70th birthday. Temperatures could bottom out around negative 20 degrees in the eastern part of the state overnight.


“Yesterday I was warning sandals and a short-sleeve shirt, and today I’m wearing a coat and scarf and turtle neck and sweatshirt and gloves,” said Kimmel, who is from Montana but hadn’t visited during the winter in 30 years.


The blast of frigid air sent temperatures plunging as far south as the Texas Panhandle, where balmy 70-degree weather fell into the teens overnight. In Oklahoma City, Monday’s high of 80 degrees hit a low of 30 degrees Tuesday morning – a drop of 50 degrees.


And in the Dakotas, where single-digit temperatures — already about 30 degrees below normal — came with frigid wind chills, dipping as low as into the negative 20s in Dickinson, North Dakota.


But that’s good news for Action Mechanical Inc., where the heating and ventilating department is booming in Rapid City, South Dakota.


“Bang, we get this arctic blast, and it just opens the floodgates,” said John Hammond Jr., a department head at the business. “We’re behind right now as we’re sitting here talking.”


In Colorado, temperatures fell into the teens — and are expected to stay there through Thursday — prompting officials to move a Veteran’s Day ceremony indoors in Denver.