The sun will set in Alaska’s North Slope this afternoon, but it will not rise above the horizon until late January.


Today begins 24 hours of darkness for many areas within the Arctic Circle, a time period known as the polar night.


Utqiagvik (Barrow) won’t see the sun for a period of more than 60 days.


These higher latitudes are bathed in darkness during the winter months as the northern hemisphere rotates away from the sun due to the tilt of the Earth’s axis.


Aviation camera in Utqiagvik (Barrow) shows snow, clouds on Friday.

Aviation camera in Utqiagvik (Barrow) shows snow, clouds on Friday.


The opposite will occur in the southern hemisphere today, as areas within the Antarctic Circle begin 24 hours of continuous daylight.


When the sun rises again on Jan. 22, communities on the North Slope will begin rapidly gaining daylight, until the sun stays up 24 hours a day starting May 11, 2017.


KTVA meteorologist Rachael Penton can be reached by email, or on Facebook or Twitter.


The post See ya, sun! Alaska’s North Slope gets last sunrise until January appeared first on KTVA 11.