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Potential second victim in Providence sexual abuse case

By KTVA Alaska 11:46 PM November 8, 2013

Court documents reveal a 17-year-old reported Allen Miller to police for sexual assault in August

ANCHORAGE – Court records reveal there may be another underage victim of 28-year-old Allen Miller, the medical worker police arrested Monday and charged with sexually abusing a teenage girl under his care at Providence Hospital.

New court documents show police may have taken a report about Miller months before his arrest.

A complaint and affidavit by Miller’s arresting officer, used in court upon his arrest in lieu of official charging documents, reveal Miller may have abused a victim in August. Anchorage police filed a report on Aug. 30 from a 17-year-old girl recovering from a car crash in Providence Medical Center’s pediatric ward. She was in a chest brace, with her head covered in bandages after a recent skin graft, when the record shows Miller sexually assaulted her in her sleep.

“I don’t know that he necessarily woke [her] up on purpose,” said Sgt. Cindi Stanton with the Anchorage Police Department’s Crimes Against Children Unit.

The report notes the victim was on pain medication and, despite her condition, knew “she had not dreamt or hallucinated the assault.”

Upon questioning, court records show Miller confessed to touching the 17-year-old inappropriately, in a manner “that had nothing to do with any medical treatment.” A detective heard that confession, but police said Thursday they couldn’t talk about whether it would lead to additional charges.

”The whole investigation is still ongoing,” Stanton said. As of Thursday, “charges have not been made” relating to “the other victim at Providence.”

Miller still faces three charges of sexual abuse of a minor for his first victim, a 14-year-old girl hospitalized with cystic fibrosis. Police said Miller first attacked her in July, and again in October. The first attack went unreported because the victim “feared for her life.”

”I don’t know that it was a threat made by [Miller],” Stanton said. “I think that was just something she thought of. Maybe that will be an aggravator” to his charges, she added.

The document shows the 14-year-old victim did not report because “she was in fear of not surviving her illness if she jeopardized her treatment.”

“That’s why children have delayed reporting,” Stanton said. “A fear of what might happen, fear of someone not believing them. A lot of times kids don’t disclose because they think no one will believe them, they’ll get in trouble … [and so] they wait.”

When questioned by police, Miller claimed the 14-year-old initiated contact, which Miller said was continued with “inappropriate and sexual” text messages and shared photographs.

“We are doing analysis … on the electronics from the girl,” Stanton said. The claim, even if true, won’t change much, Stanton emphasized. “She’s 14, and whether she said ‘Hey, I want you to do something like this,’ it doesn’t matter. She’s 14, he’s 28. It’s still sexual abuse of a minor.”

Police are also now interviewing two other underage girls—also admitted to Providence for cystic fibrosis—whose names were provided to investigators by the 14-year-old victim, who claimed the other two girls “had suffered similar assaults.”

“Those people have been interviewed,” Stanton said.

Stanton said the investigation is revealing a familiar pattern.

”All of these people that prey on children are finding people, whether they have diseases, family trouble, or self-confidence issues,” she said. “In my experience, yeah, this happened in a hospital, but it’s the same type of scenario that this type of suspect engages in.”

A spokesperson at Alaska Regional Hospital confirmed Thursday that Miller worked through a contractor at the hospital from August through September of 2011. His position, a “sleep lab technician in training,” gave him access to patients as young as 14 years old. The hospital spokesperson stressed Miller’s “in training” title meant “he would have been accompanied by a registered sleep lab technician at all times.”

Jane Urbanovsky oversees the state-run background check system for workers in Alaska. She said medical personnel are screened through seven state and national databases, including
checks for registered sex offenders. In addition, the state uses a fingerprinting check should applicants submit false information.

“That’s the safety net of having a fingerprint based background check,” she said. “Those things are going to come up by the [state] public safety [agency] and the FBI.”

Urbanovsky said in the past seven years, she’s overseen 150,000 checks. With a five percent “hit rate,” she said it’s helped prevent about 7,500 people from working with vulnerable kids or adults.

Spokespersons at both Providence and Alaska Regional said, in addition to passing their own background checks, Miller would have been screened for his job at both hospitals using the state’s background check process.

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