• Forecast
  • News Tip
  • Categories
Temperature Precipitation
Estimated read time
2m

Must-have medical tech devices for seniors

By Ivanhoe Newswire 5:51 PM May 2, 2014

There are almost 40 million Americans over the age of 65.

Five years from now, that number is going to double. That means one-in-five people will be in their mid-60s. Those 85 and older will stand for 15 percent of the population. Seniors want independence and new technology is allowing them to live at home longer than ever before. Now, there are four high-tech devices that you need to know about.

Josie and Bernie Shelly are in their 80s and have no plans of slowing down.

“I’ve never been afraid a day riding with him,” Josie Shelly told Ivanhoe.

However, an accident at home frightens them both.

“I think that’s always on your mind, if he was to fall or one or the other wasn’t around,” Josie said.

One-in-three people over the age of 65 falls each year, but new technology is now keeping a watchful eye on our aging population.

“We are doing research to find things to keep older adults in their home longer,” Debra Krotish, PhD, assistant director for Senior Smart, the University of South Carolina School of Medicine in Columbia, told Ivanhoe.

A vibration detector can be placed on the floor to detect if a person has fallen.

Motion detectors track a person’s movement. Family members or friends can track the movement or non-movement from their computers, without being too intrusive.

“If you put them by the bedside or by the bathroom door, you know that mom has gotten up in the middle of the night,” Dr. Krotish said.

New research shows 30 percent of people who end up in nursing homes do so because they couldn’t manage their medication.

Well, pill dispensers have come a long way, from a box with pills divided by day to an automated pill dispenser. A caregiver can load several days’ worth of medicine and the machine is coded to deliver the right amount at the right time.

And a blood pressure cuff and scale sends data by Bluetooth to an online system that family members and caregivers can access.

These are four ways to keep seniors safe and at home.

No single private insurance plan or public program pays for all types of assistive technology. Medicare pays for up to 80 percent of the cost of what it calls durable medical equipment.

The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs offers more extensive financial assistance for veterans needing it.

 

Latest Stories

  • News

    UPDATE: MEA restores power to all but 835 customers

    by KTVA CBS 11 News on May 25, 22:35

    Last updated at 12:15 a.m. on Thursday, May 26 The Matanuska Electric Association reported late Wednesday night that all but 835 customers had power restored after a vehicle crash knocked down a utility pole. “Everyone is back on except those affected by a damaged feeder,” the company said on its Twitter account. The company stated […]

  • Crime

    Shooting at South Anchorage gas station leaves 1 dead

    by KTVA CBS 11 News on May 25, 21:25

    Last updated at 10:58 p.m. on Wednesday, May 25 The Anchorage Police Department says someone was killed in a shooting at a Holiday gas station on Abbott Road Wednesday night. The shooting was reported around 9 p.m., according to a statement from police. When police arrived at the scene, they found a person dead from […]

  • News

    Kittens in need of foster families

    by Bonney Bowman on May 25, 20:29

    Anchorage Animal Care and Control (AACC) says it is seeing an influx of kittens and needs more people to care for them by fostering them. The goal of fostering is to socialize the kittens and get them ready for adoption. Jay Jackson has been a kitten foster mom for four years, and said it’s rewarding […]

  • News

    Inside a classified Cold War-era antenna site, now shut down

    by Bonney Bowman on May 25, 19:49

    After 50 years monitoring radio waves, the AN/FLR 9 antenna array on Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson was shut down Wednesday. The site, also known as the “elephant cage,” is a relic from the Cold War. At 40 acres in size and standing 120 feet tall, the antenna array stands mostly unchanged from when it was built […]

  • Lifestyle

    Bean’s Café chef hoping to win Food Network challenge

    by Shannon Ballard on May 25, 19:08

    Shawn Dinkins is a chef at Bean’s Café who helps serve around 800 hot meals daily and is almost always hustling to make sure lunch is ready on time for those who might not otherwise have it. “I know I could have worked at any other restaurant and I love restaurants, but this is where my […]

  • News

    Anchorage gets first canine wildlife inspector

    by Lauren Maxwell on May 25, 18:53

    He may seem like an unlikely hero, but U.S. Department of Fish and Wildlife officers are hoping Dock, an 18-month-old Labrador retriever who started life as a shelter dog, can help them solve a serious problem. Anchorage is one of the busiest cargo hubs in the world, but not everything that comes through the state […]

  • Crime

    DOC commissioner calls officer’s arrest a victory for new unit

    by Eric Ruble on May 25, 16:55

    The Department of Corrections said Wednesday the arrest of one of their own was frustrating for commissioner Dean Williams, but a small victory for a new DOC internal affairs unit. At a press conference, Williams credited the successful investigation and arrest of Goose Creek Corrections officer Adam Spindler, 32, to the commissioner’s new Professional Conduct […]

  • News

    Town Square Park fountain will be removed to address public safety concerns

    by KTVA CBS 11 News on May 25, 14:49

    Anchorage’s Town Square Park fountain will soon be taken down in an effort by the municipality to combat public safety concerns, according to Mayor Ethan Berkowitz. “This fountain is a way of camouflaging criminal activity that I don’t think we just need to tolerate,” Berkowitz said. The mayor made the announcement late-Wednesday morning inside of […]