• Forecast
  • News Tip
  • Categories
Temperature Precipitation
Estimated read time
3m 16s

Bert Rudman

By Bert Rudman 1:30 AM August 20, 2013

News Director

When I was a kid, growing up in Maine, our family had a daily ritual. Dad would be home at 6 in time for the local news. Then we’d watch the national news. Each night we’d have dinner at 7 and discuss what we’d learned. Television news was truly the campfire around which our family gathered. And being able to discuss current events with my parents made me feel like a grownup.

In high school I wasn’t much of an athlete and I decided writing for the student paper would be a good way to get girls. My scheme didn’t work out quite the way I’d planned — I met my sweetheart after bumping into her in the schoolyard — but after writing a series of stories that I thought made a difference on campus I did begin to understand the power of the press and the incredible responsibility reporters have to get the facts right.

My story-telling instincts turned to movie production at Colorado College and New York University Film School. And then I hit a wall: at 22 no one would hire me to direct the next Great American Movie. So after all those years of school the only way I could make money was by teaching skiing, which I did in Aspen. After one drought-plagued winter I still needed a job and just happened to meet the Sheriff of Pitkin County in a local bar. He needed a deputy after firing the one that let Ted Bundy escape from the second floor of the courthouse. I signed on to policing an amazing three years of murders, suicides, and robberies — anything but drug enforcement. The Sheriff didn’t want government entrapping citizens with undercover drug investigations. 60 Minutes came to town to do a story called Walking Tall in Pitkin County… One Man Up Against the Federal Government … and I helped the producer with the piece. After it aired I asked him how I could get into television. It seemed like a perfect combination of skills I’d acquired: writing, visual production and a healthy respect for the dark side of humanity. He told me to go to the smallest market I could find and learn on the job about what it took to tell stories on TV.

Presque Isle, Maine was my first stop, followed by reporting gigs in Oklahoma City and Seattle. I took a local producing job in Atlanta and jumped to ABC News in 1989 for what would turn out to be a nearly 20-year run with the network in Georgia, New York and Los Angeles. Early in 2013 I received a call from a headhunter wondering if I’d be interested in a news director’s job in Anchorage. Before he could continue with “Alaska” I said yeah, not so much, I had done a few documentaries there and even had a fishing trip with my father to Willow once… but I was comfortable living in Southern California. He convinced me to meet the people who were dreaming of building the first high definition news product in Alaska and the plans they shared with me blew my mind: new technology, compelling stories and a chance to build a news department from scratch.

I took the bait and became a resident of Anchorage in June. Since arriving I began what I thought would be the difficult task of recruiting talent from the Lower 48. For many, I thought, Alaska would be too far away from their families and friends, too cold and dark in the winters and too small a market to challenge their professional skills. To my great surprise, Alaska does indeed sell itself… with stunning scenery, provocative stories and a frontier attitude that makes it a “can do” location for entrepreneurs. There’s an old saying that half the people who move to Alaska do so for opportunity. The other half are escaping arrest warrants in the Lower 48. We will be aggressive in covering them all.

 

Latest Stories

  • Politics

    Justice addresses lawmakers with cost-saving reforms for Alaska court system

    by Liz Raines on Feb 10, 15:33

    Chief Justice of the Alaska Supreme Court, Craig Stowers, spoke to the Alaska House and Senate in the annual State of the Judiciary address Wednesday, acknowledging the state’s unprecedented budget shortfall and offering savings within the court system. “I think it’s important that the court system be a good soldier and a good team player […]

  • DayBreak

    Workforce Wednesday: Careers in Logistics

    by Daybreak Staff on Feb 10, 14:17

    In Alaska, logistics is more than just working for FedEx or UPS. It means everything from food to fuel, cars and clothes coming through the Port of Anchorage. More than 85 percent of all Alaskans receive goods through the port. In short, logistics is the art and science of time, space and location. Jana Lage, […]

  • DayBreak

    UAA Planetarium’s Stars of the Alaskan Sky: Valentine’s Day edition

    by Daybreak Staff on Feb 10, 14:06

    It’s star gazing without the chill factor of Alaska in February and could be the perfect date idea for Valentine’s Day weekend. This Friday, Stars of the Alaskan Sky: Valentine’s Day edition will kick off at the planetarium on the University of Alaska Anchorage campus. Omega Smith, UAA Planetarium Manager, joined Daybreak on Wednesday to talk about […]

  • News

    Police-involved shooting ends in death of Barrow fire chief

    by KTVA CBS 11 News on Feb 10, 12:35

    A North Slope Borough police officer was involved in a shooting early Wednesday morning resulting in the death of a 36-year-old Barrow man. Just after 3:30 a.m., the officer responded to a call for assistance on the 7400 block of North Star Street in Barrow. While responding, a shooting occurred that resulted in the death […]

  • News

    Wrangell doctor sentenced in child pornography case

    by Associated Press on Feb 10, 10:27

    A Wrangell doctor convicted of receiving and distributing child pornography has been sentenced to 20 years in prison and a lifetime of supervised release. The U.S. Department of Justice says 54-year-old Greg Alan Salard was sentenced Tuesday and fined $25,000 by U.S. District Judge Timothy Burgess. Salard after a six-day trial in Juneau was convicted […]

  • News

    UPDATE: Mail carrier alerts sleeping homeowner to fire, calls 911

    by KTVA CBS 11 News on Feb 10, 10:14

    Updated at 12:05 p.m. on Wednesday, Feb. 10 An Anchorage mail carrier is to thank for calling 911 and alerting a homeowner to a fire Wednesday morning, potentially saving his life. Kermit Arroyo told KTVA that he heard three explosions and saw flames shooting from the residence. He called 911 and ran to the house […]

  • Politics

    Alaska Sen. Donald Olson switches sides, minority loses committee rights

    by Liz Raines on Feb 10, 9:30

    Democratic Sen. Donald Olson of Golovin is switching to the majority caucus, leaving the minority without a seat on the Senate Finance Committee. Sen. Olson was the only Democrat serving on the Senate Finance Committee, the last stop for any budget bills this session. With his change in party, the committee now comprises majority members […]

  • Politics

    Anchorage Assembly sets rules for marijuana businesses

    by KTVA CBS 11 News on Feb 10, 9:27

      ANCHORAGE — Anchorage Assembly members outlined a map of the proposed marijuana industry Tuesday evening, voting to keep marijuana businesses at least 500 feet away from schools and playgrounds. The Assembly previously proposed that pot retail stores would need to operate at least 1,000 feet from schools and playgrounds. By a 6-5 vote, Assembly members lessened […]